Symbol Stories: Mandalas

April 06, 2021

Mandalas pop into your awareness once you start looking for them. You may find one screen printed on a hoodie, emblazoned on a textile hanging in the yoga studio, or framed at an art museum - each mandala differing from the next, each offering a representation of something beautiful.

Mandalas pop into your awareness once you start looking for them. You may find one screen printed on a hoodie, emblazoned on a textile hanging in the yoga studio, or framed at an art museum - each mandala differing from the next, each offering a representation of something beautiful.

The circular ornamentation represents the universe and its interconnected metaphors. The mandala, which means circle in Sanskrit, beginswith a central point or dot, with a collection of concentric circles emanating within a square within a larger circle.  

Mandalas differ as they hold embedded meaning in the geometric imagery. For example, a circle represents the cosmos or soul; a square represents a deity; a triangle represents harmony.At the center of a mandala's composition is a symbol of significance - it could be a deity, dharma wheel, lotus flower, or another signifier that offers reverence.The integration of all these shapes offers an intersection between self, nature, and the cosmos - symbolizing the never-ending interconnectedness of all things.

The circular ornamentation represents the universe and its interconnected metaphors. The mandala, which means circle in Sanskrit, beginswith a central point or dot, with a collection of concentric circles emanating within a square within a larger circle.  

Mandalas differ as they hold embedded meaning in the geometric imagery. For example, a circle represents the cosmos or soul; a square represents a deity; a triangle represents harmony.At the center of a mandala's composition is a symbol of significance - it could be a deity, dharma wheel, lotus flower, or another signifier that offers reverence.The integration of all these shapes offers an intersection between self, nature, and the cosmos - symbolizing the never-ending interconnectedness of all things.

For over 2,000 years, the worldwide practitioners of Hinduism and Buddhism have used the diagram as a sacred element for meditation and rituals. Now, ascetic monks to casual yoga practitioners may use the artwork’s focal point for teaching personal creativity, healing the mind-body, and theorizing the concept of impermanence. Practitioners of meditation may use the mandala as a Drishti or for spiritual guidance leading to gratitude for the life cycle.

The artwork encourages a viewing experience of loving-kindness and compassion for all sentient beings. Next time you practice meditation, try creating a conscious connection between your breath and a mandala by using a soft gaze.

Namaste.

Tricia Louvar l Mukha YogaBy Tricia Louvar; All Rights Reserved @2021

Tricia Louvar l Mukha Yoga
By Tricia Louvar; All Rights Reserved @2021



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